NESPELEM - The Colville Confederated Tribes have announced they are partnering with SAMSHA and FEMA to staff five local crisis support specialists available via a hotline in response to the COVID-19 outbreak and recovery period as part of a state wide team called “Washington Listens.”

The team is available to provide information, education, emotional and non-clinical support and connection to statewide resources to those in need.

The hotline number is 1-833-681-0211.

A release reads, “We strive for the health and well-being of Tribal membership as we all face this difficult time together. This program is Anonymous, confidential and free! We strongly suggest if you are experiencing a true medical, life threatening emergency to call 9-1-1.”

According to the release, Washington Listens is a program to support anyone in Washington who is experiencing stress due to the COVID-19 pandemic or any of the events that have occurred because of it.

Washington Listens is:

• A program to help Washington rebuild our state and strengthen resiliency

• More than just the support line with new services being planned and added

• A free anonymous service for anyone in Washington

Washington Listens is not:

• A crisis line to access behavioral health services

• A referral line to other services

• A warm line for people to talk to someone with lived experiences

• A replacement for existing resources like 211

The phone line is available Monday through from from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and on weekends from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

All services are anonymous and free.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.